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History

These Roots Run Deep
 

Our horticultural heritage dates back over 120 years.

When Harry Smith immigrated from Scotland, he bought a 40 acre farm overlooking Bellingham Bay. He then built a greenhouse and planted the first seed of Smith Gardens. Year after year, season after season, we’ve carefully tended to that seed, watching it proudly as it has grown into four facilities, more than a thousand team members, and a legacy of trusted experience and dedication. At Smith Gardens, we stand by what we sow, and we can’t wait to see where we grow next.

Time to grow

1897

Brothers David and Harry Smith emigrate from Scotland to New Zealand, South Africa, Nova Scotia, and finally Bellingham Bay, Washington, where they begin working with their brother John Smith on a bulb farm.

1901

David, Harry, and Nettie Smith purchase 40 acres on Bellingham Bay and start their own farm – the original Smith Gardens.

They sold veggie starts and produce at local farmers markets in Bellingham Bay, Lynden, and Ferndale.

1950s

The second generation of Smiths, Andy, Nellie, and Russ, take over the business.

When modern transportation enables California to deliver produce to Washington daily, Smith Gardens shifts its focus to flowers, bedding plants, and potted crops.

A small shop is opened on the farm to sell trays of Marigolds, veggie starts, and cut flowers.

1960s

As a teen, Terry Smith (3rd Generation) sells mums out of the back of his truck to flower shops.

1969

The original Smith Gardens logo was developed by Terry Smith (Mark and Eric’s Dad) who also coined the term “Our Business is Growing”.

1970s

For the first time, Smith products are sold into grocery stores throughout Whatcom and Skagit Counties.

1988

Terry acquires 60 acres of a former dairy farm in Marysville, Washington and starts the second site of Smith Gardens.

The 4th generation of Smiths joins the company when Mark Smith comes aboard as the production manager.

1993

Eric Smith (4th Generation) starts spending his summers building greenhouses in Marysville.

1994

Doug Ward joins the team as CFO.

1995

Carolyn, Terry and Mark Smith worked together with a local creative designer to develop this logo.

1997

Smith Gardens acquires our first transplanting machine. Expansion continues to a third, 2-acre site in Aurora, Oregon.

1999

The Watsonville, California site, formerly a rose farm, is acquired, and Pacific Plug & Liner was launched.

2004

Brothers Mark and Eric Smith officially take over the family business from their parents, Terry and Carolyn.

2012

The Aurora Oregon facility is expanded and two additional state-of-the-art greenhouses are added.

2012

The Smith Gardens team works together to create an updated logo.

2019

Aurora has once again expanded, this time adding in a new staging and shipping area with 10 loading docks along with 6 acres of new greenhouse.

2021

Smith Gardens celebrates 120 years!

2021

In celebration of 120 years a new logo is launched!

Time to grow

Brothers David and Harry Smith emigrate from Scotland to New Zealand, South Africa, Nova Scotia, and finally Bellingham Bay, WA, where they begin working with their brother John Smith on a bulb farm.
1897

David, Harry, and Nettie Smith purchase 40 acres on Bellingham Bay and start their own farm – the original Smith Gardens.

They sold veggie starts and produce at local farmers markets in Bellingham Bay, Lynden, and Ferndale.

1901

The second generation of Smiths, Andy, Nellie, and Russ, take over the business.

When modern transportation enables CA to deliver produce to WA daily, Smith Gardens shifts its focus to flowers, bedding plants, and potted crops.

A small shop is opened on the farm to sell trays of Marigolds, veggie starts, and cut flowers.

1950s
As a teen, Terry Smith (3rd Generation) sells mums out of the back of his truck to flower shops.
1960s
The original Smith Gardens logo was developed by Terry Smith (Mark and Eric’s Dad) who also coined the term “Our Business is Growing”.
1969
For the first time, Smith products are sold into grocery stores throughout Whatcom and Skagit Counties.
1970s